Tyre Legal Limit for Mot

Tyre Legal Limit for Mot

If the safety risks do not manifest themselves, will it perhaps be the risk of a £2,500 fine and three penalty points for a worn tyre? The legal minimum tread depth for cars in the UK is 1.6mm in a continuous strip that covers the central three-quarters of the tread width and its entire outer perimeter. In wet weather, tread grooves help remove water from the contact surface between your tires and the road surface, allowing your car to brake, steer and accelerate properly. A primary groove should have a profile depth of 1.6 mm. Some grooves, sometimes called secondary grooves, may be flatter due to their design. These can be identified if they do not contain a profile wear indicator. The legal tread depth limit for tyres in the UK is 1.6mm – anything below will result in a technical inspection failure and possibly a hefty fine and points on your driving licence if you are stopped by the police. Much of your tyre`s tread is essential for grip, traction and aquaplaning resistance – so you should regularly check the tread depth to make sure you change your tyres before you reach the legal limit. A 2mm tread tire may not work as well as a 3mm tire on a road with 2.5mm of water on the surface. With that in mind, it`s probably best to be careful and replace them with 3mm. It is also required by law to ensure that car tires of different types are not mounted on opposite sides of the same axle.

The two main types of tyres are radial and transverse and must not be mixed on the same axle. A regular check of your car`s tyres can help you avoid 3 penalty points and £2,500 in fines if the tyres are worn beyond your vehicle`s legal minimum limit. Book a free tire check at your local Kwik Fit center and quickly spot potential problems. If you cannot see the outer strip on the part, your tires will be above the legal limit. The mixing of makes and samples of the same type is permitted depending on the type of vehicle and the manufacturer`s recommendations. Check your vehicle`s manual for details and tire mounting options, or ask your local Kwik Fit team for help. If you have recently suffered a flat tire and used a light or space-saving tire, you must replace it before your roadworthiness test. These tires are designed to take you home or to a workshop after a flat tire – they are not suitable for daily or prolonged use and will prevent your vehicle from complying with its technical inspection. You can increase your chances of passing your roadworthiness test and extending the life of your tires by performing regular maintenance and checks on your tires throughout the year.

This includes ensuring optimal tire pressure, checking tread depth, wheel alignment, and avoiding bad driving habits or overloading your vehicle. The good news is that tire failure can be easily prevented by performing quick visual inspections to ensure your tires pass a roadworthiness test. On this page you will find the most important rules you can use to check your tires before your next technical inspection. The tires of the car must also be properly matched, so that they must have the correct type, size, structure and axle of the vehicle. The tread grooves shall not be less than 1.6 mm through a continuous strip and shall represent 3/4 of the width and total outer circumference of the tyre. 10% of cars fail their technical inspection due to tyre problems, but even if you are not at hand with a key, checking the condition of your tyres is not negotiable. Fortunately, basic tire checks can be done quickly and easily, usually by checking tread depth, tire pressure, and any signs of wear. Temporary-use spare tires are often different in size than standard road tires and usage restrictions apply. Failure to follow the instructions in the vehicle manual and/or on the spare wheel or tire sidewall can have serious consequences. Do not exceed the recommended speed limit when using a spare tire for temporary use and respect the minimum air pressure. An important part of the success of your roadworthiness test is assessing the condition of your tires. In 2020, the DVSA found that tyre problems were the fourth most common reason for the first failure of a roadworthiness test, whether due to tread depth or general condition.